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Route 66 has a lot to see and do. It has unique roadside diners, retro neon signs, world-class museums, beautiful national parks, and famous landmarks that you can visit. The “Mother Road,” which runs through the heart of the country, is a well-known American tradition. It gives a glimpse into the uniqueness and peculiarities of American society and culture. Here are some of our favorite things to do on Route 66.

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#1 The Cadillac Ranch (Amarillo, Texas)

A short drive from Amarillo is one of the most well-known and weird places on Route 66: Cadillac Ranch, a public art installation and sculpture. There are ten half-buried Cadillacs with graffiti on them that are sitting nose-first in the red Texas desert. Visitors are encouraged to make their art by spray painting a part of their favorite Cadillac in their favorite color.

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#2 In the Painted Desert, there are a lot of colors (Indian Wells, Arizona)

Because of all the different colors and layers, this vast and beautiful landscape has been given its name. People who live in northern Arizona can see a lot of rocky badlands in this area. Every color has rocks, from pink and orange at sunrise to grey and lavender at night. Check out the sunset over the Painted Desert, where the sky and rocks turn into a fiery canvas. Please take a short detour from Route 66 and ensure you don’t miss it.

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#3 The Milk Bottle Grocery (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma)

On top of a red brick building. Because you want to know. This is Route 66. The Milk Bottle Grocery in Oklahoma City is a well-known landmark and photo spot on Mother Road. It used to be a grocery and milk store, but now it is home to a Vietnamese cafe that serves bánh m and iced coffee.

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#4 St. Louis and the Gateway Arch are on the list (St Louis, Missouri)

When you start the Route 66 drive from Chicago, St. Louis is usually the first or second place you go after you get there. It is near the Mississippi River and has a lot of different kinds of culture, history, music, and sports. You can cheer on the St. Louis Cardinals at a baseball game, hike or bike through Forest Park, and try some of the city’s best food and drink. Visitors can also take a 630-foot ride to the top of the Gateway Arch for fantastic city views.

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#5 The Route 66 Hall of Fame Museum is number five on the list (Pontiac, Illinois)

For one hundred and twenty-five miles from the place where Route 66 is thought to have started, the Route 666 Museum is filled with relics of the past. Take a picture of the Route 66 mural at the museum, look at the road’s history photos, and learn how people lived when the highway was the most important in the country.

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#6 Park number six: Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park (Foyil, Oklahoma)

For the world’s tallest concrete totem pole, look no further than Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park, three miles off Route 66. It’s an art project. It was built in 1937 by Ed Galloway, a retired art teacher. He did it because he could. This is the oldest and most prominent example of folk art in Oklahoma that people have made. The cleverly carved and painted structures in this area are primarily based on the symbolic images of birds and Native Americans.

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#7 The Wigwam Motel is number (Holbrook, Arizona)

In Holbrook, Arizona, the famous Wigwam Motel is one of only two Wigwam motels left on Mother Road. It has been added to the National Register of Historic Places because of its history.
The motel was built in 1950 and is very original and kitsch. Guests can stay in wigwams for the night, but the rooms are shaped like tipis, not wigwams.

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#8 Palo Duro Canyon is a state park in the Palo Duro Canyon area (Amarillo, Texas)

The Palo Duro Canyon State Park is only a 30-minute drive from Amarillo. It’s both exciting and beautiful. It is the second-largest canyon in the United States, and it is one of the most beautiful natural attractions in the world. It has fantastic views of color and rock formations. It’s a great place to go hiking, biking, or riding your horse. You can also stop for a picnic and enjoy the stunning views.

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#9 The Tee Pee Curios Shop has a lot of exciting things for people to buy (Tucumcari, New Mexico)

The colorful concrete wigwam and bright neon signs of Tee Pee Curios are easy to see as you drive through Tucumcari. As Route 66 got more prominent, the gas station lost its pumps. Owner: Not one to miss an opportunity, he turned this weird building into a souvenir shop that sold Route 66 memorabilia and kitsch gifts to people who came by. It still stands today.

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#10 The city of Santa Fe (Santa Fe, New Mexico)

For its Pueblo-style buildings and views of the Sangre de Cristo Rocky Mountains, the capital of New Mexico is known around the world. The Spanish founded it in 1610. On your way from Amarillo to Albuquerque, you can make a stop in the city of Rio Rancho, which is full of life and color. Find out about the many flea markets, drink margaritas in traditional plazas, and walk through the city’s twisting streets to see the adobe landmarks.

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