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Millions of red crabs from Australia’s Gecarcoidea Natalis Island have clogged bridges and highways during their annual migration. The goal is to make it to the water to reproduce. The crabs traverse through woodland regions on their journey, much like a rolling red tide, creating a spectacle for locals and tourists.

Photo credits go to universoactual.com

Some roads remain closed to protect the crabs throughout their journey to the water. In addition, special bridges were created to ensure their safe arrival.

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The migration begins when the rainy season begins, which is nearly typically between October and November. The moon’s phases govern this instant and the speed with which the displacement is carried out. This special bridge is the answer offered by the Australian Parks government authority, which is in charge of conserving the island’s flora and animals.

Some highways were closed, and special bridges were created to safeguard the crabs along their voyage, ensuring that they arrived safely. People who want to see this phenomenon must park their automobiles and carefully move between them because they tend to pile up.

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Photo credits go to koreaherald

What do the experts have to say about it?

While scientists can forecast the crabs’ itinerary, some may veer off and take a detour, causing them to fall by the wayside. Despite this, the majority of people manage to survive.

Photo credits go to koreaherald

Male crabs bathe in the sea to replace moisture in their bodies before heading out to dig their burrows when they reach the coast. The females then arrive, and the mating begins. Finally, the male crab returns to the sea for a second time before continuing its return journey. It’s worth noting that a female crab can lay up to 100,000 eggs in her lifetime.

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